Kate Morton – The Clockmaker’s Daughter review [AD]

This post contains gifted items from Pan Macmillan which have been marked in line with my disclaimer.

Release date: 20th September 2018

My real name, no one remembers.  The truth about that summer, no one else knows.

In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor on the banks of the Upper Thames. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe’s life is in ruins.

Over one hundred and fifty years later, Elodie Winslow, a young archivist in London, uncovers a leather satchel containing two unseeingly unrelated items: a sepia photograph of an arresting-looking woman in Victorian clothing, and an artist’s sketchbook containing the drawing of a twin-gabled house on the bend of a river. Over one hundred and fifty years later, Elodie Winslow, a young archivist in London, uncovers a leather satchel containing two unseeingly unrelated items: a sepia photograph of an arresting-looking woman in Victorian clothing, and an artist’s sketchbook containing the drawing of a twin-gabled house on the bend of a river.

Why does Birchwood Manor feel so familiar to Elodie? And who is the beautiful woman in the photograph? Will she ever give up her secrets?

Told by multiple voices across time, The Clockmaker’s Daughter is a story of murder, mystery and thievery, of art, love and loss. And flowing through its pages like a river, is the voice of a woman who stands outside of time, who’s name has been forgotten by history, but who has watched it all unfold: Birdie Bell, the clockmaker’s daughter.

Kate Morton writes beautifully, filled with lush descriptions of the English countryside and the various locations within this book, lulled into a dreamlike trance by lyrical prose, while an intricate spellbinding tale unfolds on the pages. 

Jumping back and fourth through time (the story runs from the Victorian era to present day), the charming story follows several generations of people who are all connected in some way to Birchwood Manor located the English countryside, and a story that is associated with this house. Due to the number of characters and different time periods, it is quite a complex book however, the story is full of bewitching charm. Do not let the complexity be off-putting as the story is very engrossing. It’s quite a thick book too, however, it only too me around two and a half days to finish. I found when I started to read, it was really hard to put down (this book is going to be a huge hit!) 

The characters are related to an event that happened in the past which echos through the generations in the most unexpected ways. The past cannot stay hidden forever and thus, emerges through the pages making itself heard. 

The past concerns a mysterious and charismatic woman called Birdie Bell. It involves a brotherhood of bohemian artists, a lost diamond, a tragic murder and a missing woman. The truth of what happened at Birchwood Manor in the summer of 1862 has been shrouded in mystery for over one hundred and fifty years. The discovery of a sepia photograph and an old sketchbook will set events in motion for a long buried secret to emerge. When reading the book, you are eager to find out the truth and makes it one of those ‘hard to put down’ books.  

The book cover is absolutly stunning! It features beautiful blooms, wildlife such as bumblebees and butterflies, and the golden inner workings of a clock. It looks beautiful displayed on my bookshelf. 

The Clockmaker’s Daughter is due to be released in September, so definitely keep an eye out or you can skip ahead and preorder now by clicking here.

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